The d major chord

Guitar Tricks Forum > Guitar Basics > The d major chord

Rumble Walrus

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Joined: 12/30/20

Posts: 115

Perhaps try moving your wrist a little further under the neck. It'll improve your bar chords too.

#11

Perhaps try moving your wrist a little further under the neck. It'll improve your bar chords too.

devy99

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Joined: 02/03/18

Posts: 6

Fretted b and e strings

I have a question in line with the d chord and somewhat the a major chord. I have no problems playing them . My question is in line with strumming them. With both chords I find that for example if I strum a d chord 4 quarter notes in a bar then switch to another chord, I can hear the fretted b and e string lower pitch back to b and e when I release to change to next chord. I’ve been focusing on getting my fingers as close as possible to the fret ..it’s better but still audible. Should I be muting my last quarter note after strumming and about to change rather than letting it ring out? I’ve released pressure on my fretting as well but still hear this. Not as noticeable as much if say i am strumming eight notes and change finger positions as quickly as possible to next chord..

#12

Fretted b and e strings

I have a question in line with the d chord and somewhat the a major chord. I have no problems playing them . My question is in line with strumming them. With both chords I find that for example if I strum a d chord 4 quarter notes in a bar then switch to another chord, I can hear the fretted b and e string lower pitch back to b and e when I release to change to next chord. I’ve been focusing on getting my fingers as close as possible to the fret ..it’s better but still audible. Should I be muting my last quarter note after strumming and about to change rather than letting it ring out? I’ve released pressure on my fretting as well but still hear this. Not as noticeable as much if say i am strumming eight notes and change finger positions as quickly as possible to next chord..