What i'd need to do to get that blues sound

Guitar Tricks Forum > Tone and Effects > What i'd need to do to get that blues sound

Violanted

Full Access

Joined: 03/21/21

Posts: 48

Hi All,

I am new to guitar new to the guitar world in general, but not new to the music world, I'm keyboard Organ player on Rock/blues sound.

I also build guitar amps, for hobby only, and mainly used for my Organ B3 to get the sound that Deep Purple were getting "Jon Lord" was indeed using a Marshall Style JTM Amp.

Now how would i apply this on Guitar is a different story, how can I get a typical blues sound is the guitar determining that or the amp or combination of both or the use of specific pedal effects?

I own so far a self built 18 Watts Amp Bluesbreaker Style, I own a little 5F1 self built as well. I also own a JTM 45 Marshall style all built out from kits.

On the Internet I found this guideline but please feel free to add anything else that is needed or could improve or make things better in terms of tone:

How to Set Up Any Amp for Blues
As well as understanding what makes a good blues tone, it’s useful to know how to set up your amplifier to dial in the best settings based on your rig. Here’s my step-by-step guide to getting a good blues tone.

Make sure your guitar’s volume and tone controls are on maximum. Use the bridge pickup.

Set the volume to a comfortable level.


Select the overdriven channel (unless you are using a pedal).


Set the gain to 3, the treble and mids to 7, and the bass to 3.


Turn off reverb and any other effects.


Begin by adjusting the gain, if you require more saturation then increase it, or decrease it if it sounds too distorted.


Increase or decrease the mids depending on if the tone sounds too thin or too full, respectively. Play some chords and single string riffs to identify this.


Increase or decrease the treble depending on if the tone sounds too harsh or too mellow, respectively. Play some chords and single string riffs to identify this.


Adjust the bass control to add more or less low-end. Play some chords to identify if this is necessary.


Add some light reverb and any other effects you wish to.

Is that all may be needed?

Cheers

Dave

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

#1

Hi All,

I am new to guitar new to the guitar world in general, but not new to the music world, I'm keyboard Organ player on Rock/blues sound.

I also build guitar amps, for hobby only, and mainly used for my Organ B3 to get the sound that Deep Purple were getting "Jon Lord" was indeed using a Marshall Style JTM Amp.

Now how would i apply this on Guitar is a different story, how can I get a typical blues sound is the guitar determining that or the amp or combination of both or the use of specific pedal effects?

I own so far a self built 18 Watts Amp Bluesbreaker Style, I own a little 5F1 self built as well. I also own a JTM 45 Marshall style all built out from kits.

On the Internet I found this guideline but please feel free to add anything else that is needed or could improve or make things better in terms of tone:

How to Set Up Any Amp for Blues
As well as understanding what makes a good blues tone, it’s useful to know how to set up your amplifier to dial in the best settings based on your rig. Here’s my step-by-step guide to getting a good blues tone.

Make sure your guitar’s volume and tone controls are on maximum. Use the bridge pickup.

Set the volume to a comfortable level.


Select the overdriven channel (unless you are using a pedal).


Set the gain to 3, the treble and mids to 7, and the bass to 3.


Turn off reverb and any other effects.


Begin by adjusting the gain, if you require more saturation then increase it, or decrease it if it sounds too distorted.


Increase or decrease the mids depending on if the tone sounds too thin or too full, respectively. Play some chords and single string riffs to identify this.


Increase or decrease the treble depending on if the tone sounds too harsh or too mellow, respectively. Play some chords and single string riffs to identify this.


Adjust the bass control to add more or less low-end. Play some chords to identify if this is necessary.


Add some light reverb and any other effects you wish to.

Is that all may be needed?

Cheers

Dave

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7689

Originally Posted by: Violanted

Now how would i apply this on Guitar is a different story, how can I get a typical blues sound is the guitar determining that or the amp or combination of both or the use of specific pedal effects?

All of the above. And it depends on what kind of tone you are after. Which artist or song you might be trying to emulate.

If you are trying to do BB King, then you need a hollowbody with a clean tone. Albert or Freddie King, you need a Gibson with a clean tone but a little bit of breakup. SRV then you need a Strat style guitar (often using the neck pickup) with more overdrive.

The process you outlined is fine for general purposes. But it's possible to use a wide variety of guitars, pickup settings, effects & amps for blues (or most any genre).

The GT Blues course goes into some of that information. And each blues song taught on GT has a gear & tone lesson for this purpose.

Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#2

Originally Posted by: Violanted

Now how would i apply this on Guitar is a different story, how can I get a typical blues sound is the guitar determining that or the amp or combination of both or the use of specific pedal effects?

All of the above. And it depends on what kind of tone you are after. Which artist or song you might be trying to emulate.

If you are trying to do BB King, then you need a hollowbody with a clean tone. Albert or Freddie King, you need a Gibson with a clean tone but a little bit of breakup. SRV then you need a Strat style guitar (often using the neck pickup) with more overdrive.

The process you outlined is fine for general purposes. But it's possible to use a wide variety of guitars, pickup settings, effects & amps for blues (or most any genre).

The GT Blues course goes into some of that information. And each blues song taught on GT has a gear & tone lesson for this purpose.

Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

Violanted

Full Access

Joined: 03/21/21

Posts: 48

Originally Posted by: ChristopherSchlegel
Originally Posted by: Violanted

Now how would i apply this on Guitar is a different story, how can I get a typical blues sound is the guitar determining that or the amp or combination of both or the use of specific pedal effects?

All of the above. And it depends on what kind of tone you are after. Which artist or song you might be trying to emulate.

If you are trying to do BB King, then you need a hollowbody with a clean tone. Albert or Freddie King, you need a Gibson with a clean tone but a little bit of breakup. SRV then you need a Strat style guitar (often using the neck pickup) with more overdrive.

The process you outlined is fine for general purposes. But it's possible to use a wide variety of guitars, pickup settings, effects & amps for blues (or most any genre).

The GT Blues course goes into some of that information. And each blues song taught on GT has a gear & tone lesson for this purpose.

Hope that helps!

Of course helps, I am into B B King stuff, Eric clapton, and Freddy King for sure. Those are the main artist I play cover with Organ, Piano and other keyboards already, now is Guitar time once I'll get a lttle more proficients, but already going through some basic songs, Easy ones.

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

#3

Originally Posted by: ChristopherSchlegel
Originally Posted by: Violanted

Now how would i apply this on Guitar is a different story, how can I get a typical blues sound is the guitar determining that or the amp or combination of both or the use of specific pedal effects?

All of the above. And it depends on what kind of tone you are after. Which artist or song you might be trying to emulate.

If you are trying to do BB King, then you need a hollowbody with a clean tone. Albert or Freddie King, you need a Gibson with a clean tone but a little bit of breakup. SRV then you need a Strat style guitar (often using the neck pickup) with more overdrive.

The process you outlined is fine for general purposes. But it's possible to use a wide variety of guitars, pickup settings, effects & amps for blues (or most any genre).

The GT Blues course goes into some of that information. And each blues song taught on GT has a gear & tone lesson for this purpose.

Hope that helps!

Of course helps, I am into B B King stuff, Eric clapton, and Freddy King for sure. Those are the main artist I play cover with Organ, Piano and other keyboards already, now is Guitar time once I'll get a lttle more proficients, but already going through some basic songs, Easy ones.

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds